Lothair Eau de Toilette Spray, 100ml

$289.00
In stock
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Penhaligon’s Lothair Eau De Toilette is an adventurous and bold Fougeré, inspired by the luxurious and decadent commodities which were traded through London’s historic docks at the turn of the 19th Century. Lothair opens with the salty tang of grapefruit and juniper, and a brilliant green sensation from fig leaf. The smoky heart of black tea is softened by fig milk and magnolia, sailing into an ambergris, cedar and wenge woods base; reminiscent of the varnished decks of the elegant Victorian Tea Clipper Ships.

PRODUCT DETAILS

01

Fragrance Family:
Aromatic Fougère

Main Note:
Fig

Concentration:
Eau de Toilette

Occasion:
Smoky fig! A peculiar joy. Confident wearing for the daytime

Made in the UK

EDITOR'S NOTES

02

Lothair manages to remedy the problem of fig scents by giving it a larger narrative beyond just the fig itself. Placed in the context of a tea clipper ship, exotic spices and dried tea are all found. If Diptyque's Philosykos was given a narrative, or Hermes' Un Jardin En Mediterranee found itself on a journey, Lothair would be it.

FRAGRANCE NOTES

03

Grapefruit, Fig Leaf, Pink Pepper, Juniper, Cardamom, Bergamot, Fig Milk, Lavender, Magnolia, Geranium, Black Tea, Vanilla, Musk, Cedarwood, Ambergris, Wenge, Oakmoss.

THINGS TO KNOW

04

Penhaligon's Trade Routes Collection is inspired by the luxurious and decadent commodities which were traded through London’s historic docks at the turn of the 19th Century. Piled high on the quaysides and arriving daily from the farthest flung corners of the globe in a burst of exoticism, were the rarest treasures in dizzying abundance. Reflecting the spirit of adventure, luxury and decadence, perfumer Bertrand Duchaufour has designed Lothair from the famous Tea Clipper Ships that navigated the globe to bring exotic wares to British shores. Lothair is named after one such ship, first launched in 1870 and the last ship built at Rotherhithe. The ship was lost in 1910, following a career with a reputation as one of the fastest clippers.